From Train Station to Mobility Hub

Multi-modal transport routes are often proclaimed to be the sustainable alternative to car trips, where commuters shift between higher and lower capacity modes to reach their destination. However, this system is reliant on the proximity to transport nodes and available connecting routes only found in higher-density urban fabrics. The challenge of transporting commuters to network nodes in lower-density suburbs is referred to as the first/last-mile gap. Shared AV shuttles offer one solution to this problem, however, points of friction are likely to occur at the interchange between modes as existing transport infrastructure has not been designed to enable AVs. The following design explores how adaptations to the existing train station at Lyngby can spatially support this new technology as users seamlessly transfer between AV shuttle and high capacity train.

Program: Mobility hub (train station, autonomous bus terminal, bicycle parking, light rail), mixed-use development
Location: Lyngby, Denmark
Year: 2017
Type: Research Proposal
Collaborators: NIRAS
Team JAJA: Jakob S Christensen, Jan Tanaka, Kathrin Gimmel, Robert Martin, Sam De Boever, Stephen Dietz-Hodgson, Natalia Gruszczynska

Dynamic shuttle buses

Shared AV shuttle systems are commonly discussed as one solution to the first/last mile problem. Conceptually, this system operates similarly to already established car-pooling services such as Uber, Lyft, and Via, where users’ ride requests are bundled and assigned into trips with similar pick-up and drop-off points. However, the success of these services is highly dependent on population density, the concentration of users, and the similarity of users’ departure and arrival points. By focusing the departure or arrival point around public transport nodes, the shared AV shuttle system’s efficiency is improved through an accumulation of similar trips.

Dynamic shuttle buses

Shared AV shuttle systems are commonly discussed as one solution to the first/last mile problem. Conceptually, this system operates similarly to already established car-pooling services such as Uber, Lyft, and Via, where users’ ride requests are bundled and assigned into trips with similar pick-up and drop-off points. However, the success of these services is highly dependent on population density, the concentration of users, and the similarity of users’ departure and arrival points. By focusing the departure or arrival point around public transport nodes, the shared AV shuttle system’s efficiency is improved through an accumulation of similar trips.

Existing Conditions

The existing Lyngby station is a train station on the Hillerød radial of The Finger Plan. It is centrally located within the suburb but is spatially segregated from the suburb’s high street and mass of urban functions by a large bus terminal, two lanes of traffic, parking, and overpass highway to the east. The station’s entrance is located underneath the highway, where it is also connected to a shopping arcade with 15 retail stores, including two supermarkets.

Existing Conditions

The existing Lyngby station is a train station on the Hillerød radial of The Finger Plan. It is centrally located within the suburb but is spatially segregated from the suburb’s high street and mass of urban functions by a large bus terminal, two lanes of traffic, parking, and overpass highway to the east. The station’s entrance is located underneath the highway, where it is also connected to a shopping arcade with 15 retail stores, including two supermarkets.

Designing for the future

The primary design challenge for this proposal was to create adequate space for the pick-up and drop off areas for commuters arriving by AV shuttles. While many advocates for AVs suggest that excess parking space will be released from sharing these vehicles, studies have shown that the spatial requirements for pick-up and drop-off areas will be high as they should be designed to accommodate maximum inflow at peak times. Therefore, the main move of the design is to consolidate the seven lanes of traffic that run in both directions adjacent to the station into one 150m designated area for transfer. This area follows design principles found at airport kiss and ride locations where one lane is used for parking, one is used to wait for a free space, and the final is used to pass by when finished.

Designing for the future

The primary design challenge for this proposal was to create adequate space for the pick-up and drop off areas for commuters arriving by AV shuttles. While many advocates for AVs suggest that excess parking space will be released from sharing these vehicles, studies have shown that the spatial requirements for pick-up and drop-off areas will be high as they should be designed to accommodate maximum inflow at peak times. Therefore, the main move of the design is to consolidate the seven lanes of traffic that run in both directions adjacent to the station into one 150m designated area for transfer. This area follows design principles found at airport kiss and ride locations where one lane is used for parking, one is used to wait for a free space, and the final is used to pass by when finished.

Spatial Benefit

The spatial benefit of this consolidation is the release of over 7000 sq.m of publicly owned land directly adjacent to the train station. In this proposal, that space is utilized by constructing a mixed-use development of residential apartments, commercial space, public amenities, as well as parking facilities for micromobility devices adjacent to new separated bicycle paths. The proposed development takes its form by closing the urban block to the east, creating a series of public and semi-public courtyards of varying scales that respect the existing pathways between the station and the high street. The final move is to relocate the shopping arcade from underneath the highway to the new mixed-use development. The now-vacant space is transformed into a permeable covered thoroughfare that gives access to the station platforms directly from the pick-up/drop area. There are also seated waiting areas, and digital wayfinding screens that help commuters find their designated shuttle.

Spatial Benefit

The spatial benefit of this consolidation is the release of over 7000 sq.m of publicly owned land directly adjacent to the train station. In this proposal, that space is utilized by constructing a mixed-use development of residential apartments, commercial space, public amenities, as well as parking facilities for micromobility devices adjacent to new separated bicycle paths. The proposed development takes its form by closing the urban block to the east, creating a series of public and semi-public courtyards of varying scales that respect the existing pathways between the station and the high street. The final move is to relocate the shopping arcade from underneath the highway to the new mixed-use development. The now-vacant space is transformed into a permeable covered thoroughfare that gives access to the station platforms directly from the pick-up/drop area. There are also seated waiting areas, and digital wayfinding screens that help commuters find their designated shuttle.